This year, the council has $69,000 to award in contracts. Fifteen local organizations made 21 applications for funding, totaling $109,144. Those requests ranged from $250 for Boy’s State to $26,994 for food and supplies for the Harvest House homeless shelter.

The Boonville City Council will decide Monday which local groups it will contract for services this year.

The city funds several community programs every year using part of a half-cent Capital Improvements Program sales tax that Boonville voters last approved in 2015. It will be up for renewal on the 2020 municipal ballot.

This year, the council has $69,000 to award in contracts. Fifteen local organizations made 21 applications for funding, totaling $109,144. Those requests ranged from $250 for Boy’s State to $26,994 for food and supplies for the Harvest House homeless shelter.

A committee is tasked with recommending to council which 63 percent of the requests were most worth funding. It recommended fully or partially funding all but one request — $3,500 to the Boonslick Area Chamber of Commerce for the Boonslick Business Expo. The committee recommended fully funding nine requests, mostly of $1,000 or less, and partially funding 11 other requests.

The CIP funds have to be used to provide services that the council considers to be public benefits.

The committee recommended providing $3,100 to the chamber for this year’s Fourth of July fireworks. The chamber originally requested $3,000, making it the only request that the committee recommended awarding more than the amount for which the group asked. The chamber pays for all the fireworks, and the city contract reimburses it for half the cost, said Chamber Associate Karen Esser.

OATS submitted the largest request that the committee recommended funding in full. The $6,000 contract would cover part of the expenses of running the KatyFlyer in-town bus three days a week in Boonville, said Mid-Missouri Regional Director Dion Knipp.

Most groups, like the Riley Equine Center, would receive a portion of the requested funds. Bonnie Riley, director of the therapeutic horse riding center, asked for a total of $6,000 to help run the Connections and Freedom Riders programs.

Freedom Riders is a program for local residents with physical, mental or emotional challenges, Riley said. A licensed psychologist, physical therapist and a certified instructor oversee riding classes three times a week.

Connections is a 10-week course for children with family disruptions or other emotional challenges, with the goal of building connections, first with the horse, and then with other people. It starts with individual riding, then moves on to group activities, giving the children a chance to connect with each other.

The committee recommended awarding a $1,000 contract for each group.

Riley said she’s grateful for any support the city can give her, but she’s going to need more donations to run the programs this year. The city’s contract makes or breaks the program, Riley said.

“The kids who utilize this program have no funding,” Riley said. “We really appreciate the city helping us with this, because if they don’t, we can’t do it.”

Along with more financial support, Riley said the center badly needs volunteers. Many of the people who volunteer at the center live in Howard County, so it’s been hard for them to come down with the Boonslick Bridge blocked off due to flooding, Riley said. The center depends on volunteers to do most of the work, from running the kitchen to preparing the horses.

The committee also recommended awarding $5,000 to Unlimited Opportunities for children’s therapy, half of the $10,000 it requested. The $5,000 would cover about 9 percent of the cost of therapy for 19 people dealing with challenges like intellectual or physical disabilities, and don’t qualify for Medicaid, said Community Services Director Cara Johnson.

It’s not as much as they asked for, but it’s $500 more than Unlimited Opportunities was awarded last year, and they’re appreciative of any support, Johnson said. It will help pay for services like aquatic therapy, which helps patients strengthen and stretch their muscles. It will also help with early-intervention therapies for people with challenges that affect how their brains operate and interfere with their abilities to learn life skills and make friends.