Several Constitutional amendments, along with a proposition will be on the ballot for Tuesday.

Amongst the area, state and national candidates running for office, other decisions will have to be made by area voters. Some of these decisions will have an impact years in the future.

Constitutional Amendment 1 is the first issue on the ballot.

“Shall Missouri continue for 10 years the one-tenth of one percent sales/use tax that is used for soil and water conservation and for state parks and historic sites, and resubmit this tax to the voters for approval in 10 years?” according to the Missouri Secretary of State’s Office. “The measure continues and does not increase the existing sales and use tax of one-tenth of one percent for 10 years. The measure would continue to generate approximately $90 million annually for soil and water conservation and operation of the state park system.”

According to the fair ballot language, a “yes” vote will continue for 10 years the one-tenth of one percent sales/use tax that is used for soil and water conservation and for state parks and historic sites. This will be resubmitted to the voters for approval in 10 years.

A “no” vote will not continue this sales/use tax.

If passed, this measure will not increase or decrease taxes.

Constitutional Amendment 2 is directed at the heart of campaigns across the state.

This amendment would establish limits on campaign contributions by individuals or entities to political parties, political committees, or committees to elect candidates for state or judicial office. The amendment would also prohibit individuals and entities from intentionally concealing the source of such contributions. It would require corporations or labor organizations to meet certain requirements in order to make such contributions; and provide a complaint process and penalties for any violations of this amendment.

According to the secretary of state’s office it is estimated this proposal will increase state government costs by at least $118,000 annually and have an unknown change in costs for local governmental entities. Any potential impact to revenues for state and local governmental entities is unknown, according to the office.

“A “yes” vote will amend the Missouri Constitution to establish limits on campaign contributions by individuals or entities to political parties, political committees, or committees to elect candidates for state or judicial office. This amendment prohibits individuals and entities from intentionally concealing the source of such contributions. This amendment also requires corporations or labor organizations to meet certain requirements in order to make such contributions. This amendment further provides a complaint process and penalties for any violations of this amendment,” according to the fair ballot language.

Constitutional Amendment 3 has been a tightly fought out measure.

This amendment proposes to increase taxes on cigarettes each year through 2020, at which point this additional tax will total 60 cents per pack of 20. It will create a fee paid by cigarette wholesalers of 67 cents per pack of 20 on certain cigarettes, which fee shall increase annually; and deposit funds generated by these taxes and fees into a newly established Early Childhood Health and Education Trust Fund?

“When cigarette tax increases are fully implemented, estimated additional revenue to state government is $263 million to $374 million annually, with limited estimated implementation costs. The revenue will fund only programs and services allowed by the proposal. The fiscal impact to local governmental entities is unknown,” according to the secretary of state’s office.

Teacher organizations have been very much in favor of this measure since the money will go directly to the necessary entities.

“Missouri Ethics Commission records show that an affiliate of RJ Reynolds Tobacco Company has provided over $6.6 Million in funding for three front groups pushing a tax increase that uses kids as pawns to sell more cigarettes. A recent newspaper article quotes a Reynolds spokesman saying they will spend $5 million more for the campaign,” according to badformissouri.com who aregue that this amendment will benefit cigarette comapnies.

The next amendment proposes to prohibit additional sales and use tax on certain services.

“Shall the Missouri Constitution be amended to prohibit a new state or local sales/use or other similar tax on any service or transaction that was not subject to a sales/use or similar tax as of January 1, 2015? Potential costs to state and local governmental entities are unknown, but could be significant.  The proposal’s passage would impact governmental entity’s ability to revise their tax structures.  State and local governments expect no savings from this proposal,” according to the ballot language,” according to the ballot language.

If passed, this measure will not increase or decrease taxes.

Amendment 6 has had wide support among lawmakers in Jefferson City.

It states, “that voters may be required by law, which may be subject to exception, to verify one’s identity, citizenship, and residence by presenting identification that may include valid government-issued photo identification?

The proposed amendment will result in no costs or savings because any potential costs would be due to the enactment of a general law allowed by this proposal. If such a general law is enacted, the potential costs to state and local governments is unknown, but could exceed $2.1 million annually.”

This amendment has also been controversial at times and a divide of support in the Cooper County area.

As area residents head to the polls on Tuesday, it is important one knows the issues and do their research. More information can be found by going to the Missouri Secretary of State’s website at https://www.sos.mo.gov/petitions/2016BallotMeasures.