Boonville High students and their artwork are on display this Sunday at the Zuzak Wonder Store, 311 Main Street.



Featuring the work of 22 students from Boonville High's Helen Sanders advanced art classes, the meet-and-greet event will showcase the paintings, drawings, batik fabric, pottery and jewelry creations of students. Wallets made from Duct Tape and recycled glass are also included in the event.

 


Boonville High students and their artwork are on display this Sunday at the Zuzak Wonder Store, 311 Main Street.

Featuring the work of 22 students from Boonville High's Helen Sanders advanced art classes, the meet-and-greet event will showcase the paintings, drawings, batik fabric, pottery and jewelry creations of students. Wallets made from Duct Tape and recycled glass are also included in the event.

Sunday's event marks the opening of the event, entitled "Pirate's Treasure Trove," which will run through Sunday, March 18.

The idea behind the show is to give young artists the opportunity to have an actual gallery experience, explains Sanders in a news release, including selection of work, hanging the art, naming the show and putting together a reception.

Sanders said, “I have always encouraged my students to visit art galleries whenever they have the opportunity. I think many feel a little intimidated by them and won’t go in...Art galleries can be a great resource to students in the development of their own art style.”

Chris Bolin, co-owner of the Zuzak Wonder Store, said his gallery was looking to help out, seeing the event as "a community benefit" and as a way to bring in new artists.

"I had talked to (Zuzak) about it a couple of times about it," said Sanders. "Finally it all came together."

She said the event is designed to give students "the feel for what it's like to be a professional artist," by promoting their own work and setting up a show.

"The students can learn a bit about how a gallery operates," Bolin said of the event, as the students have taken the reins of the event, working on everything from gallery labels to the refreshments for Sunday.

Some of Sanders' students are shooting for a career in art, so these could be crucial tools.

"Pirate's Treasure Trove," which is open to the public, also gives students the chance to have works purchased — another crucial facet of becoming an artist. Some slumped glass bottles and jewelry by Sanders' advanced seniors are up for purchase.

"Some of my students are nervous about selling own personal work," said Sanders. That's understandable, considering the work put into each piece. She encourages making prints of prized pieces so the originals are safe with the artist.

Bolin said his personal favorite of the students' artwork was a batik entitled "Ravens."

"Once I saw the title, it came alive," he said.

Sanders is "really thankful for the Zuzak," adding that this event is "something that (she's) wanted to do for a long time."