Incumbent Cooper County Presiding Commissioner Don Baragary narrowly defeated challenger Bill Embry with about 52 percent of the vote in Tuesday’s primary election, which attracted an approximate 42 percent voter turnout.

Baragary campaigned on the concept of running the county like a business with an emphasis on increased reserve funding. Embry campaigned on local community control of agriculture and health policies.

The issue of the Tipton East concentrated animal feeding operation (CAFO) project, which was approved by DNR earlier this year, surrounded much of the local debate around the commission. Baragary supported the project and was against implementing a county health ordinance that would limit CAFOs in Cooper County for fear of attracting a lawsuit against a health ordnance. Embry was supported by the Opponents of Cooper County CAFOs advocacy group, which has filed suit against the county for alleged Sunshine Law violations.

Keith Bail won the associate circuit judge position over Kim Searfoss by a massive approximate 79 percent of the vote.

Sarah Herman was elected county clerk with about 59 percent of the vote over Keat Catlett.

Marcia Imhoff ran away with the treasurer race with about 71 percent of the vote over Joy Baragary.

Cooper Democrats favored incumbent U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill with about 80 percent of the vote. McCaskill won the nomination with about 83 percent of Missouri.

The county’s Republicans chose Josh Hawley to oppose McCaskill in the general election. Hawley won Cooper by 49 percent and the state by about 59 percent.

Cooper County also sided with the rest of the state in rejecting Proposition A by about 58 percent in the county and 67 percent of the state. If passed, Proposition A would have prohibited forced membership or the forced payments to unions for those who do not wish to support a union. With Prop A defeated, those who work in union-represented workplaces who do not wish to support their union or its political stances must pay partial, fair-share dues to compensate for union representation. With Prop A defeated, those who work in union-represented workplaces who do not wish to support the union’s its political stances must pay partial, fair-share dues to compensate for union representation.