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Boonville Daily News - Boonville, MO
A Welcome Place in America's Heartland
2013 Remember The Removal Bike Ride
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By Pulaski County USA
Come on down to Pulaski County USA located in America’s Heartland! Pulaski County is home to Fort Leonard Wood, which for the longest time was nicknamed Fort Lost in the Woods. We may have that small town feel, but we are growing and trying to lose ...
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No Longer Lost in the Woods: Pulaski County USA
Come on down to Pulaski County USA located in America’s Heartland! Pulaski County is home to Fort Leonard Wood, which for the longest time was nicknamed Fort Lost in the Woods. We may have that small town feel, but we are growing and trying to lose that “lost” image! Join us every Thursday as we publish a new blog about all of the fun and exciting things we have to do in our unique little spot in Missouri!

Whether you are planning a family vacation, girls getaway, man-cation, attending a military graduation, or just passing by…we guarantee you will love it here! Our rich history and outdoorsy atmosphere makes for great adventures! Visit one of five Museums in the county, travel Route 66 and explore 33 original miles of the Mother Road, cool down on a fun float trip along the Big Piney and Gasconade Rivers, fly fish in the Roubidoux our award winning trout stream, go scuba diving in our nationally recognized underwater cave or take an elevator up to the only restaurant in a cave in the world! We don’t lack on fun and interesting activities in our neck of the woods, so be sure to follow our blog and maybe you’ll want to come visit us some day! Hope to see ya soon!
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The 2013 Remember the Removal Bike Ride is the fifth annual bicycle ride commemorating the forced removal of the Cherokee Nation from its homelands during the winter of 1838-39.

The trek across the country is more than 900 miles taken over a three week period. The riders represent the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, stopping at places significant to the Trail of Tears.

The group stopped at the Roubidoux Spring, also known as Big Spring, at Laughlin Park in Waynesville, at the same site that their ancestors stopped 175 years ago. The encampments along the Roubidoux River at Waynesville were documented in journals by three men: Dr. W.I. Morrow (1837), Rev. Daniel S. Butrick (1839), and B.B. Cannon (1837). Those records led to Laughlin Park being designated as a certified site on the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail in 2006. Laughlin Park is one of seven certified sites in Missouri.

Remember The Removal riders gather around as Waynesville Mayor Luge Hardman welcomes them to Laughlin Park. Laughlin Park is one of seven certified Trail of Tears sites in Missouri.

Remember The Removal riders gather around as Waynesville Mayor Luge Hardman welcomes them to Laughlin Park. Laughlin Park is one of seven certified Trail of Tears sites in Missouri.



The riders noticed differences at the site from their 2012 stop. Waynesville has an ongoing project to improve the Trail of Tears site with an interpretive walking trail with exhibits.

Following an overnight stay in Pulaski County USA, Remember the Removal riders headed west towards Springfield, continuing their trek to their final destination of Tahlequah, Oklahoma, the capitol of the Cherokee Nation.

Riders take a well deserved rest along the banks of the Roubidox at the Big Spring in Waynesville, Missouri. June 14, 2013

Riders take a well deserved rest along the banks of the Roubidox at the Big Spring in Waynesville, Missouri. June 14, 2013



Remember The Removal riders pose for a picture at Roubidoux Spring (also known as Big Spring) in Laughlin Park, Waynesville, Missouri with Waynesville Mayor Luge Hardman (orange shirt), Deloris Wood of the Missouri Trail of Tears Associaion, and Missouri District 122 Representative Steve Lynch.

Remember The Removal riders pose for a picture at Roubidoux Spring (also known as Big Spring) in Laughlin Park, Waynesville, Missouri with Waynesville Mayor Luge Hardman (orange shirt), Deloris Wood of the Missouri Trail of Tears Associaion, and Missouri District 122 Representative Steve Lynch.



2013 Remember The Removal rider at Roubidoux



To learn more about Remember The Removal Bike Ride, and to follow their journey, please visit: http://www.facebook.com/removal.ride

To learn more about the City of Waynesville, Missouri’s role as an encampment on the Trail of Tears please visit: http://www.waynesvillemo.org/encampment.htm

To learn more about other historical sites in Pulaski County USA please visit: http://www.pulaskicountyusa.com

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